Newsletter 090 October 2001

Dear Friends

Despite the showery weather we had a good attendance and completed most of our tasks. Thanks to those who braved the weather. Conditions were great for planting out the Ironbarks at the Depot site. Inspection of an area where the old wattle was burnt revealed a good germination of wattles and some eucalypts. With that in mind we planted the new trees nearby so that the little plantation could be fenced to protect them from the grazing Kangaroos. There is grass in abundance but somehow a newly planted tree seems more appettising. The plantings of three years ago have grown very well following their protection with tall wire guards. Two Austral Indigo plants were flowering and the wattles, which are about three metres tall, flowered in the winter. Re-vegetation of this site has not been easy but we will persist with the help of the Parks crew.

A nice germination of Genista seedlings greeted us on the Howlong Road site and they were quickly disposed of. It was encouraging to see a variety of ground cover plants colonising the site along with  emerging wattles and flowering Chocolate Lilies.

Morning tea at Bartley’s was a damp affair, even the billy took an age to boil!. Turquoise Parrots, Rufous Whistlers and many Fan-tailed Cuckoos were noted. In the last two weeks we have found three dead Golden Bronze Cuckoos and on returning home I found another dead in my garden. One found lying dead at Bartley’s appeared to be in good condition with no obvious damage to the body.

When we reached Brady’s Block the rain came down in earnest. In our brief stay we added four new plants to the flora list for the block and one raptor before calling it a day.

Around the Park: The winter greenhoods have completed their flowering as have the Diuris pardina. Everlastings and Chocolate Lilies, Rice Flower, {Pimelia} and Creamy Candles {Stackhousia} are all beginning to flower. The Narrow-leaf Bitter-pea, Daviesia leptophylla is the best I have seen it for years. The tiny Pterostylis mutica and bicolor are in flower but one needs a good eye to spot them. The dainty Western Golden-tip, Goodia medicaginea is flowering well. This is one of the rarer species of the park.

Amongst the birds, the Swift Parrots left in mid-September and are no doubt making plans to breed in Tasmania. The Regents appear to have left the park despite the fact that there is plenty of White Box in flower which is attracting many other honeyeaters. Honeyeater Picnic ground is proving to be a great spot for the birds this year, probably due to the good flowering of the surrounding White Box. The Koala still presents himself for all to see in the trees around the picnic table.

The summer migrants are gradually turning up. This season there are good numbers of Fairy Martins about so perhaps they will renew their nests under the Frogs Hollow underpass and displace the pardalotes which have been using them.

New bird for the list: A New Holland Honeyeater was seen feeding in blossom in Christine’s garden and was caught on video. Well done Alan Gibb for picking up the call.

Coming Events


1. Environmental Weeds A Time for Action. Workshop at Riverina Tafe October 19th. Contact Sue Brunskill on ph/fax 0357 287 285  e/m This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for information.

2. Friends of Warbys AGM and BYO Barbecue Saturday October 20 . Contact: Helen 0357 218 937

3. Ironbark Festival Sunday October 21. 9.00am start at the Tourist Park. Helpers needed for the marquee and the walks.


NEXT MEETING  SATURDAY  NOVEMBER 3RD  9.00AM  AT THE POST OFFICE

We will be tackling the Olives in the Mount Pleasant block. Please BYO pruning saw/secateurs.

BYO lunch and energy. This is a part of the park we have not worked in before and should be interesting.

Tee Shirts: Are you in need of a new shirt? Just a few left at $20 each. Should the park name change they will be a collector’s item!

‘ORANGUTANS  IN  PERIL’

Public lecture by Dr Willie Smits a world renowned authority on the endangered orangutan. Dr Smits is on a national tour, sharing his vast experience in orangutan conservation .

Wednesday October 17th at 7.00pm in the Nowik Lecture Theatre, CSU Albury Campus, Guines St., Albury.

Admission Free. Supper provided. Contact: Craig Reid 0260 519 651