Newsletter 055 August 1998

Newsletter No 55 August 1998

Dear Friends

Our August walk took us along about half the White Box Walking Track in reverse. We went in search of the several Regent Honeyeaters that had been seen feeding in the White Box and Red Stringybark. The day was bleak and overcast and birds were scarce. One of  the Regents was located after giving itself away with a single call. There were a few Little Lorikeets, small flocks of Brown-headed and White-naped  Honeyeaters, a few Black-chinned and the usual Yellow-tufted H/e’s. Brown Tree Creepers, Yellow Robins, a female Golden Whistler, a party of White-winged Choughs and a few White-browed Babblers and a lone Noisy Friar-bird were also listed.

A Boobook Owl was disturbed as we paused to inspect an old tree and everyone had good views. It was probably sheltering in one of the hollow entrances. There were lots of interesting fungi ranging from minute to those with caps of around 15 centimetres. Lichens and mosses in all shades from grey to bright green were perfect after the rain, many displaying their fruiting bodies. There were orchids too. What appeared at first glance to be early Maroonhoods, Pterostylis pedunculata were found growing under the shelter of an old, spreading, Daphne Heath. I showed them to Scott a few days later and we agreed that they  were “something different”. After consulting Flora of Victoria and Backhouse and Jeanes’ Orchids of Victoria it was evident that they were Pterostylis alata. This is a new record for the park. Several more sites have since been found. They also grow in the Beechworth area. There were hundreds of tiny rounded leaves of  the small Gnat Orchid, Cyrtostylis reniformis. The flower heads were just appearing from the leaf fold. The leaves were grey-green above and light green below and hugged the ground tightly. Mats of leaves were on the walking track so many flowers will be trampled by walkers. A few Buttercups, a bush of purple Hovea and a few flowers of Guinea Flower, Hibbertia riparia added colour to the day.

Back at Cyanide Dam and rather leg weary we retired to the comfort of the hall for tea and a meeting. Quiche, Pizza and delightful salads readied us for the evening programme. We welcomed visitors from the North-east Field Naturalists Club and some local people to the evening programme. Dr Neil Blair presented an entertaining and informative account of his Antarctic adventure. It was exciting, cold, expensive, educational and the ice sculptures were incredibly beautiful. The penguins, which we are used to seeing in immaculate condition were grubby and smelly. After visiting the colony no one was allowed to set foot on the deck until they had scrubbed their boots to remove the guano and the smell! The fauna, although quite “tame” had its comfort zone of approximately one metre and anyone who violated it got the message from the occupant. And rightly so.

After a quick cuppa and chat we settled down for the “hot” part of the evening with Glen. Seems it was not so hot in the early part of the trip with extremely cold nights being the norm. Glen used his extensive environmental knowledge to complement his slides as he took us on “tour” of some remote spots. He spoke about the urge to climb Uluru, but out of respect for the wishes of the indigenous people they resisted. I suspect a few people left with itchy feet and plans for a trip were probably being hatched on the homeward journey!

Thank you Neil and Glen for a great evening.



The Great Gapsted Gaffe!  Public opposition to the use of public bushland in the Alpine Shire for the purpose of creating a resort has caused the Victorian Alps Wine Company to abandon its plans. See overleaf for the remarks made by the proponents. I wonder what their “big picture” looked like?



NEXT MEETING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER  6TH  9.00AM . MEET AT CHILTERN POST OFFICE.

We will attack the feral plants at the entrance to the park which is adjacent St Joseph’s School.

Bring tools, gloves, lunch, energy and a friend. Afternoon walk taking in orchids, fungi and birds and possibly inspection of some nest logs with Bruce Quin.Newsletter No 55 August 1998 Dear Friends Our August walk took us along about half the White Box Walking Track in reverse. We went in search of the several Regent Honeyeaters that had been seen feeding in the White Box and Red Stringybark.

The day was bleak and overcast and birds were scarce. One of the Regents was located after giving itself away with a single call. There were a few Little Lorikeets, small flocks of Brown-headed and White-naped Honeyeaters, a few Black-chinned and the usual Yellow-tufted H/e’s. Brown Tree Creepers, Yellow Robins, a female Golden Whistler, a party of White-winged Choughs and a few White-browed Babblers and a lone Noisy Friar-bird were also listed. A Boobook Owl was disturbed as we paused to inspect an old tree and everyone had good views. It was probably sheltering in one of the hollow entrances.

There were lots of interesting fungi ranging from minute to those with caps of around 15 centimetres. Lichens and mosses in all shades from grey to bright green were perfect after the rain, many displaying their fruiting bodies.

There were orchids too. What appeared at first glance to be early Maroonhoods, Pterostylis pedunculata were found growing under the shelter of an old, spreading, Daphne Heath. I showed them to Scott a few days later and we agreed that they were “something different”. After consulting Flora of Victoria and Backhouse and Jeanes’ Orchids of Victoria it was evident that they were Pterostylis alata. This is a new record for the park. Several more sites have since been found. They also grow in the Beechworth area. There were hundreds of tiny rounded leaves of the small Gnat Orchid, Cyrtostylis reniformis. The flower heads were just appearing from the leaf fold. The leaves were grey-green above and light green below and hugged the ground tightly.Mats of leaves were on the walking track so many flowers will be trampled by walkers. A few Buttercups, a bush of purple Hovea and a few flowers of Guinea Flower, Hibbertia riparia added colour to the day.

Back at Cyanide Dam and rather leg weary we retired to the comfort of the hall for tea and a meeting. Quiche, Pizza and delightful salads readied us for the evening programme.

We welcomed visitors from the North-east Field Naturalists Club and some local people to the evening programme. Dr Neil Blair presented an entertaining and informative account of his Antarctic adventure. It was exciting, cold, expensive, educational and the ice sculptures were incredibly beautiful. The penguins, which we are used to seeing in immaculate condition were grubby and smelly. After visiting the colony no one was allowed to set foot on the deck until they had scrubbed their boots to remove the guano and the smell! The fauna, although quite “tame” had its comfort zone of approximately one metre and anyone who violated it got the message from the occupant. And rightly so.

After a quick cuppa and chat we settled down for the “hot” part of the evening with Glen. Seems it was not so hot in the early part of the trip with extremely cold nights being the norm. Glen used his extensive environmental knowledge to complement his slides as he took us on “tour” of some remote spots. He spoke about the urge to climb Uluru, but out of respect for the wishes of the indigenous people they resisted. I suspect a few people left with itchy feet and plans for a trip were probably being hatched on the homeward journey! Thank you Neil and Glen for a great evening.


The Great Gapsted Gaffe! Public opposition to the use of public bushland in the Alpine Shire for the purpose of creating a resort has caused the Victorian Alps Wine Company to abandon its plans. See overleaf for the remarks made by the proponents. I wonder what their “big picture” looked like?


NEXT MEETING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 6TH 9.00AM . MEET AT CHILTERN POST OFFICE. We will attack the feral plants at the entrance to the park which is adjacent St Joseph’s School. Bring tools, gloves, lunch, energy and a friend. Afternoon walk taking in orchids, fungi and birds and possibly inspection of some nest logs with Bruce Quin.

From the AGM:

Following the presentation of the Financial Statement and the Annual Report Gary Deayton took the chair for the election of office bearers. Convenor/Treasurer: E. Collins Secretary: Scott Jessup Public Officer: Steve Bush Committee: Neville Bartlett, Ian Lindner, Darren Phillips, Philip Seely.

General meeting:

1. Subject to funding from Parks Victoria the motion was put that, “ At the October General Meeting of the Friends of Chiltern Park, the group will decide whether or not to change its name to the Friends of Chiltern Box Ironbark National Park” Moved E.Collins Sec. Chris Sobey. Carried. Note: An application for funding is being prepared.

2. Tony Marsh has offered to update our web site. If there is anything you wish to have considered for inclusion please send it to me by August 17th.

3. Accounts were presented and passed for payment.. Mv. N.Bartlett Sec.Neil Blair. Crd.

Note:

1 The rain water tank has been returned to its site at Cyanide Dam. Note:

2 A pink line on your address label indicates that you are no longer a financial member.