Newsletter 015 November 1994

FRIENDS OF CHILTERN PARK
Convener: E.Collins 057 261 484
Newsletter No.15. November 1994
Dear Friends,
Chiltern Valley No.2 Dam was the venue for November. Showers and a cold wind kept us on the move. A bird count revealed few waterbirds but plenty of bush birds including good numbers of Turquoise Parrots. The total count was 28 species. Grey Kangaroos were also present. Blakely’s Red Gum and Yellow Box, some of which was in flower, along with Pepper Trees, Lightwood, Varnish and Golden Wattle were the main plant species. There were scattered plants of Bursaria, Sweet Briar and Tagasastes (Lucerne Tree). It will be interesting to observe the vegetation changes in this block when the fencing is upgraded to exclude stock.
Our next target was an area of the park which is to be improved. Loads of old metal and rusty tins were dragged onto the track ready for removal by CNR staff. By-this time it was pouring so we decided on an early lunch and meeting in the tourist park shelter. Hot pies (from the local baker) tasted really good.
During the week, John and Jenny completed the removal of the fruit trees at the Magenta block. English Broom was removed from the Lancashire Gap Road and further work was done on the Caper Spurge at Bartley’s Block. Next stop was the Genista patch on the Howlong Road. This had been successfully sprayed and we had been waiting for rain to encourage the seeds to germinate. It rained and sure enough the seedlings appeared. Eager hands ensured their lives were short!. The dead shrubs were piled for removal. It will be interesting to watch the regeneration beneath the tall Grey Box trees.
There have been some interesting bird sightings in the park in recent weeks. Painted Honeyeaters have moved into the area in  considerable numbers. Their high pitched call, resembling “Georgie Georgie”, makes them easy to locate. They are frequently found feeding on Mistletoe berries.


An uncommon bird for this region, the Black Honeyeater has also been seen. The dry conditions inland are probably responsible for its presence so early in the season. Previous records have been for the mid-summer. A magnificent Square-tailed Kite was seen on the
Beechworth Road. This is a prize sighting for birdwatchers in this area.
Chiltern Valley No. 2 Dam was the venue for the Bird Observers’ Club of Australia camp from October 28th until November 2nd. An enjoyable time was had by all and the bird list for the four days totaled 130 species. Among these were some special birds such as Grey-crowned Babblers, Snipe, Regent Honeyeaters, Painted Honeyeaters and ‘White throated Nightjar. The latter flew over the camp fire at dusk.
Survey news:
The Turquoise Parrot log monitoring has begun for this spring. Bruce passes his thanks to those partaking in this work.
On November 8th the quadrants for the Regent Honeyeater survey were pegged out. This work took a full day. It was made much easier with the generous help from members. The following day the line search routes were pegged. Natasha Schedvin thanks everyone who assisted, As soon as the record sheets are refined this work can proceed. There are a number of Regent Honeyeaters in the park at the moment but they do not appear to have settled in readiness for breeding. Report forms for sightings are now available. Please report sightings to me as soon as possible so that they can be followed up. Most sightings have occurred where Ironbark is in flower.

Historic Places DCNR:
Personel from DCNR Historic Places section will be in Chiltern to conduct a review of historic places in the Chiltern/Rutherglen Goldfields. Several of the sites in the park already have official classification.
A Farewell
The death this week of Jill Rossiter, of Wangaratta, has saddened those who knew her. Jill was a fine botanist who was always willing to share her knowledge. She was a member of the Botany Group based at Wangaratta and campaigned tirelessly for the environment. When she came to live in Wangaratta she set about creating a beautiful native garden and in later years was to share this garden with other garden lovers. Jill’s passing is a great loss. We extend our sympathy to her family and friends.
From the Meeting:
Apologies were received.
2. Incorporation details were finalised.
3. Incorporation fee approved.
4. Arrangements were made for the Regent site marking on 8th November.
5. Next Log monitoring desirable by first week in December.
6 Our Friends group was invited to have input into the Victorian Auditor-General’s revue of the Victorian National Parks Service, Comments were sought on a list of matters in relation to Chiltern Park. Members considered the points and a reply was sent.
6. NEXT MEETING IS A BREAKFAST MEETING AT CYANIDE DAM ON SUNDAY DECEMBER 4TH AT 8AM. Keen birdwatchers will be earlier I’m sure! Bring a friend AND your breakfast!
7. JANUARY MEETING (7TH AND 8TH)IS THE CAMP OUT. This was great fun last year, with a spotlight walk amongst other things. It will be held at Cyanide Dam. Keep the date free, come and have fun.
NOTICES
An invitation from the Albury Wodonga Environment Centre to dine with Bob Brown and Ian Cohen at the Thai Lotus licensed restaurant in Albury on Wednesday November 16th at 7pm.. Vegetarian Banquet, cost $25 a head. Tickets: Phone (060) 212 627.
Native Grassland Identification Workshop.
If you are interested in learning about native grasses this could be for you.
Tutors: Dr. Graenie Louimer and Glen Johnson, Whole day activity. Cost $15.For further details contact Sue Brunskill on (057) 287 285. .
Registration Fonn
Name ……………………………………………..Amount enclosed …………………………………………………..
Address ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Phone ……………………………………….
Please rate your experience with grass ID. Beginner …………………………………….
1 know a few species ……………………..I know quite a number of species ……………………………………………………………
Bird List for the Chiltern Valley No.2 Dam November 5 1994
Pelican             Black-fronted Plover         Brown Falcon
Little Pied Cormorant     Dusky Woodswallow         Raven
Yellow-billed Spoonbill     White-browed Woodswallow     Whistling Kite
Masked Lapwing     White-breasted Woodswallow     White-browed Babbler
Sacred Kingfisher     Welcome Swallow         Olive-backed Oriole
Turquoise Parrot     Red-rumped Parrot         Eastern Rosella
Rainbow Bee-eater     Red-capped Robin         Superb Blue Wren
Red-browed Firetail     Diamond Firetail         Shining bronze Cuckoo
Eastern Shrike-tit     Tree Martin             White-plumed Honeyeater
Restless Flycatcher     Willie Wagtail             Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Fuscous Honeyeater
Plant list for Chiltern Valley No: 2 Dam November 5 1994
*Tagastastes         Pepper Trees
Golden Wattle        Varnish Wattle
*Sweet Briar *        Spike Rush
Yellow box         Blakely’ s Red gum
Wattles:         Lightwood
Sweet Bursaria         Mistletoe
*Thist1es         Tall Sedge
Various grasses which we may be able to name after the Grass Identification School!

SIGHTINGS OF A TIGER QUOLL
Dasyurus Maculatus


There has been an unconfirmed sighting of this rare carnivore in our area. Efforts are underway to confirm its presence. You can help.
The last known animal in Chiltern was shot by an old rabbit hunter hi the mid 1970’s and taken to the Fisheries and Wildlife Centre in Wangaratta for identification. If you are around this district please take note of animals caught in your headlights (as this sighting was). Note carefùlly the location and any behaviour. As soon as possible contact a DCNR office.


Chiltern (057)261 234 or Wodonga (060) 556 111
FRIENDS OF CHlLTERN PARK WISH TO THANK THE CHILTERN BRANCH OF WAW CREDIT UNION FOR SUPPORTING OUR GROUP AND THE ENVIRONMENT THROUGH THE PRINTING OF OUR NEWSLETTERS.

ANOTHER
Mining threat to Flora Reserves
There are currently proposals to “explore” In the Inglewood Flora Reserve by “bulk sampling” with bulldozers and excavators. Open-cut mining is being considered. We understand similar operations may also be under consideration for the Tarnagulla Flora Reserve. We are horrified that such operations should be contemplated for conservation reserves.
These reserves are Important for the protection of rare plant species and for undisturbed areas of green mallee vegetation which are heavily disturbed for eucalyptus oil harvesting outside the reserves. There are few reserves in this largely fragmented and cleared region of Central Victoria.
In Inglewood Flora reserve, permission was originally granted for underground mining in the early 80’s on the basis this would have limited
surface effects; but even this has been found to have an Impact In terms of the above-ground Infrastructure required (Parkwatch No. 147;
Dec 1986).
VNP ,newsletter Nov. 1986